CONSTRUCTION RIDE ON TOYS - ON TOYS


Construction ride on toys - Weird japanese toys.



Construction Ride On Toys





construction ride on toys






    construction
  • the act of constructing something; "during the construction we had to take a detour"; "his hobby was the building of boats"

  • a group of words that form a constituent of a sentence and are considered as a single unit; "I concluded from his awkward constructions that he was a foreigner"

  • the creation of a construct; the process of combining ideas into a congruous object of thought

  • The building of something, typically a large structure

  • Such activity considered as an industry

  • The style or method used in the building of something





    ride on
  • Ride On is the primary public transportation system in Montgomery County, Maryland. Ride On serves Montgomery County as well as the community of Langley Park in Prince George's County. Ride On also serves the Takoma Metro station, and Sibley Memorial Hospital in Washington, D.C.

  • Ride On is an album by Irish folk singer Christy Moore, released in 1984, and is widely regarded as one of his best. It contains one of his most popular songs, the title track.

  • Ride On is the third album released by former Guns N' Roses guitarist Izzy Stradlin. It also features Duff McKagan who is also an ex-member of Guns N' Roses





    toys
  • A person treated by another as a source of pleasure or amusement rather than with due seriousness

  • (toy) plaything: an artifact designed to be played with

  • An object, esp. a gadget or machine, regarded as providing amusement for an adult

  • (toy) dally: behave carelessly or indifferently; "Play about with a young girl's affection"

  • An object for a child to play with, typically a model or miniature replica of something

  • (toy) a nonfunctional replica of something else (frequently used as a modifier); "a toy stove"











Expressway 1 Opens on 7 July 1970




Expressway 1 Opens on 7 July 1970





Seen at a rest stop on Expressway 1 as I proceed from Jikjisa in Gimcheon to Beopjusa in Boeun County.

2008 was the 60th anniversary of the founding of modern South Korea (Republic of Korea). To mark the occasion, Chosun Ilbo, the largest newspaper in the nation and a mouthpiece of the far right, ran a series of 60 significant events of the past 60 years. And this is probably the most significant event of them all - the construction of Expressway 1, the 428-kilometer, 4-lane link between Seoul and Busan.

Shortly after rising to power in 1961 via a coup, General/President Park Chung-hee wanted a way to develop the national economy. After a 1964 visit to West Germany and a ride on the Nazi-built Autobahn system, he developed an obsession with expressways, and soon decided to build one of his own. The problem: South Korea had neither the funds nor the technology to pull it off.

Once bare-bones funding was procured - via normalization of relations with Japan in 1964, and via participation in Vietnam War later in the 1960s - Park decided to go ahead with the construction in 1968. Soldiers were conscripted to build the expressway at a breakneck pace, and dozens were killed in construction accidents, most of them building tunnels through this difficult stretch in Okcheon County. The construction cost ate up 25% of the national budget, despite being done in the cheapest way possible. Opposition was fierce - from opposition politicians, everyday citizens, and foreign lenders alike - as there were very few automobiles around, and the expressway was pretty much to be a toy for the rich. Park's response was that the expressway was necessary for better transportation of industrial materials and goods.

After 27 months of construction, Expressway 1 opened in its entirety on 7 July 1970, and the drive time from Seoul to Busan was shortened from 12 hours to 4 hours. And as Park had planned, it helped spur industrialization.

Of course, due to the breakneck shoddy construction at the lowest possible cost, the expressway started crumbling right away. That was the game plan after all; open the road at any cost, get the industrialization going, make some money, then pay for the costly repairs. Continual repairs and upgrades have since made Expressway 1 more sound, more durable, and safer; most sections were widened to 6, 8, or 10 lanes, center dividers and other safety features were upgraded, and some sections, such as the curvy tunnels through this area that were also prone to slick surfaces in winter, were completely abandoned, being replaced by new, straighter, wider sections. This also shortened the expressway's total length to 416 kilometers, though between Gimcheon and Okcheon, there still is the original 1970 monument that marks the exact halfway point, with 214 kilometers to either the Seoul end or the Busan end.

South Korea went on to construct many more expressways, though that meant comparative neglect of rail and conventional roads, a deficiency not fully addressed until about 2000 or so. I found South Korean expressways to be on par with most European motorways and superior to many US interstates.

Just like Germany can thank the Nazis for the Autobahn system and a world-class auto industry that it spawned, South Korea can likewise thank the brutal military dictatorship for its expressways and its own auto industry. As much as I hate to say it, it is true. And the South Korean far right and the Korean-Americans would love to scrap the current democracy and return to military dictatorship, because it was so much more of an overachiever. Grrr...











Kirkman & Son, 50 Bridge Street




Kirkman & Son, 50 Bridge Street





DUMBO, Brooklyn

Features: Six bays on Bridge Street and twelve bays on Water Street; segmental-arch openings; brick lintels and stone sills; on Bridge Street, wider openings for pedestrian entrances at ends; vehicular entrance in center; cornice with raised brick bands; iron tie rods on Water Street; iron shutter supports at windows.

Significant alterations: Two additional stories set back on roof; iron railing on roof; windows replaced; concrete block bulkhead at west end of Water Street elevation; facade painted.

History: In 1894, Alexander S. Kirkman began purchasing property at the eastern end of block 31. The site at the corner of Bridge and Water Streets housed a cooperage at the time it was purchased by Kirkman. The building at the corner of Bridge and Water Street is the first structure erected by Kirkman & Son on this block. In April 1895, in celebration of the completion of the factory, Kirkman & Son held a banquet on the second floor of the building for its 84 employees. Kirkman & Son Company traces its history back to 1837 in New York City, but did not move to Brooklyn until 1880. The firm was founded by English immigrant John Kirkman, but it was his son Alexander who opened the Brooklyn factory and was responsible for the firm’s growth into a major manufacturer of borax soap, octagon soap (soap shaped like an octagon so that it could easily be held), soap powder, softener, floating soap, and cleanser. Like other DUMBO manufacturers, Alexander Kirkman lived in Brooklyn, at 266 Clinton Avenue.

Alexander Kirkman was killed by a trolley while out riding his bicycle in c. 1897. As the firm expanded, it also built on Blocks 32 and 42. Like other firms in DUMBO, including the Grand Union Company and the Arbuckle Coffee Company, Kirkman gave away coupons with each purchase that could be traded in for premiums. A 1910 advertisement stated “BEWARE of persons offering to buy our coupons or to exchange them for trading stamps. If you dispose of our coupons to brokers or dealers you do not get full value. It is to your advantage to exchange them for our premiums only.” This ad, published in November also noted that Christmas toys were ready for distribution in its premium offices. In 1913, Kirkman & Son employed 375 men in Brooklyn. In 1930, the company was sold to Colgate-Palmolive-Peet. Production in Brooklyn ceased during the 1940s and in 1945 the property was sold.

The simple brick facade, articulated by segmental openings, radiating brick lintels and projecting sills, and raised-band cornice, marks 50-52 Bridge Street as an example of the American Round Arch style. This, together with its slow-burning mill construction, makes it representative of American factory architecture of this period and contributes to the architectural and historical character of the DUMBO Historic District. Built in 1894-95, during a major period of 37 development when manufacturers such as Kirkman & Son were making DUMBO into one of the city’s most important industrial neighborhoods, the structure contributes to the district through its architecture, structure, and the fact that its owners played a significant role in the area’s history.

- From the 2007 NYCLPC Historic District Designation Report









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POPULAR TOYS OF THE 70S - POPULAR TOYS OF


Popular toys of the 70s - Hot toys cia - Most popular toys for girls 2011



Popular Toys Of The 70s





popular toys of the 70s






    popular
  • (of cultural activities or products) Intended for or suited to the taste, understanding, or means of the general public rather than specialists or intellectuals

  • (of a belief or attitude) Held by the majority of the general public

  • carried on by or for the people (or citizens) at large; "the popular vote"; "popular representation"; "institutions of popular government"

  • (of music or art) new and of general appeal (especially among young people)

  • Liked, admired, or enjoyed by many people or by a particular person or group

  • regarded with great favor, approval, or affection especially by the general public; "a popular tourist attraction"; "a popular girl"; "cabbage patch dolls are no longer popular"





    of the
  • biggest consumers of energy in homes and buildings, which are heating





    toys
  • (toy) dally: behave carelessly or indifferently; "Play about with a young girl's affection"

  • A person treated by another as a source of pleasure or amusement rather than with due seriousness

  • An object for a child to play with, typically a model or miniature replica of something

  • (toy) plaything: an artifact designed to be played with

  • (toy) a nonfunctional replica of something else (frequently used as a modifier); "a toy stove"

  • An object, esp. a gadget or machine, regarded as providing amusement for an adult





    70s
  • File:1970s decade montage.png|From left, clockwise: US President Richard Nixon doing the V for Victory sign after his resignation from office after the Watergate scandal in 1974; Refugees aboard a US naval boat after the Fall of Saigon, leading to the end of the Vietnam War in 1975; Alan Shepard

  • The 70s decade ran from January 1, 70, to December 31, 79. It was the eighth decade in the Anno Domini/Common Era, if the nine-year period from 1 AD to 9 AD is considered as a "decade".











Warlord Comic: Secret Agent Information Pages - 7 of 8




Warlord Comic: Secret Agent Information Pages - 7 of 8





The 'Warlord Secret Agent' information pages came with every issue of Warlord comic - usually in the centre pages.

Warlord was a comics anthology published weekly in the United Kingdom between 28 September 1974 and 27 September 1986.

It was first published in 1974 by D.C. Thomson. The comic was dedicated to wartime adventures and was a popular success, leading IPC Magazines to create a competitor, Battle Picture Weekly, in 1975. Warlord included several stories per issue, initially centered around a character called Lord Peter Flint (Codename: Warlord), a World War II version of popular spy James Bond.

At the end of 1978 Warlord absorbed D. C. Thomson's action comic Bullet. In total, Warlord ran for twelve years (627 issues), from 1974 until 1986, at which point it was incorporated into the long-running Victor. For the next four years after the comic's demise the publishers produced summer specials, ending in 1990.

To join and get the wallet, you had to crack a code in the comic, you then sent it off with your postal order (for 20 pence!) and you would receive a superb brown or black Secret agent wallet containing an ID card, a code book, several message cards and a Winged W badge. With the wallet, you were able to read coded messages in the comics.


Bullet was a comic book published weekly in the UK during the 1970s.

First published on 14th February 1976 by D.C. Thomson for seven pence, it focused upon adventure, action, revenge, science fiction, war and sport. It was a popular comic for boys throughout its publication.

The main character was a moustached, multi-talented, highly trained secret agent, aptly named Fireball. When his parents had died in a mysterious car crash when he was a young child, he became the ward of his father's friend Lord Peter Flint, a wartime hero (aka Warlord).
Fireball had been trained by Uncle Pete (since childhood) in the arts of shooting, martial arts, sports and survival - this was as well as the usual reading and writing skills. The full Fireball story was secret, but could be acquired by joining the Fireball club, which gave you the story enclosed in a red plastic wallet (The survival guide came as a free gift with the 2nd issue of Bullet.) This story was used as the plain text for a one-time pad for encrypting/decrypting secret messages which often appeared in Bullet's central pages as a sequence of random numbers. You also received a Fireball pendant for joining. Fireball's original pendant (which he always wore) saved his life on one occasion - it shielded him from a long range sniper's bullet. Fireball's arch enemy was Catriona Klansberg (aka The Cat). Fireball had a soft spot for her - he had a habit of letting her slip away after he had just thwarted her evil plan.

Fireball was said to have been modelled on Peter Wyngarde.

In December 1978 the comic merged into the longer running Warlord comic.












Warlord Comic: Issue One Cover - 6 of 8




Warlord Comic: Issue One Cover - 6 of 8





Warlord was a comics anthology published weekly in the United Kingdom between 28 September 1974 and 27 September 1986.

It was first published in 1974 by D.C. Thomson. The comic was dedicated to wartime adventures and was a popular success, leading IPC Magazines to create a competitor, Battle Picture Weekly, in 1975. Warlord included several stories per issue, initially centered around a character called Lord Peter Flint (Codename: Warlord), a World War II version of popular spy James Bond.

At the end of 1978 Warlord absorbed D. C. Thomson's action comic Bullet. In total, Warlord ran for twelve years (627 issues), from 1974 until 1986, at which point it was incorporated into the long-running Victor. For the next four years after the comic's demise the publishers produced summer specials, ending in 1990.

To join and get the wallet, you had to crack a code in the comic, you then sent it off with your postal order (for 20 pence!) and you would receive a superb brown or black Secret agent wallet containing an ID card, a code book, several message cards and a Winged W badge. With the wallet, you were able to read coded messages in the comics.


Bullet was a comic book published weekly in the UK during the 1970s.

First published on 14th February 1976 by D.C. Thomson for seven pence, it focused upon adventure, action, revenge, science fiction, war and sport. It was a popular comic for boys throughout its publication.

The main character was a moustached, multi-talented, highly trained secret agent, aptly named Fireball. When his parents had died in a mysterious car crash when he was a young child, he became the ward of his father's friend Lord Peter Flint, a wartime hero (aka Warlord).
Fireball had been trained by Uncle Pete (since childhood) in the arts of shooting, martial arts, sports and survival - this was as well as the usual reading and writing skills. The full Fireball story was secret, but could be acquired by joining the Fireball club, which gave you the story enclosed in a red plastic wallet (The survival guide came as a free gift with the 2nd issue of Bullet.) This story was used as the plain text for a one-time pad for encrypting/decrypting secret messages which often appeared in Bullet's central pages as a sequence of random numbers. You also received a Fireball pendant for joining. Fireball's original pendant (which he always wore) saved his life on one occasion - it shielded him from a long range sniper's bullet. Fireball's arch enemy was Catriona Klansberg (aka The Cat). Fireball had a soft spot for her - he had a habit of letting her slip away after he had just thwarted her evil plan.

Fireball was said to have been modelled on Peter Wyngarde.

In December 1978 the comic merged into the longer running Warlord comic.










popular toys of the 70s







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THE INCREDIBLES MCDONALDS TOYS : MCDONALDS TOYS


The incredibles mcdonalds toys : Fisher price infant toys



The Incredibles Mcdonalds Toys





the incredibles mcdonalds toys






    incredibles
  • The Incredibles is the original soundtrack album, on the Disney label, of the 2004 animated feature The Incredibles. The album is completely orchestral and was composed by Michael Giacchino. The entire score were recorded with analogue audio tapes.

  • The Incredibles is a 2004 computer-animated superhero film produced by Pixar Animation Studios and distributed by Walt Disney Pictures. It was written and directed by Brad Bird, a former director and executive consultant of The Simpsons.

  • The Incredibles is a video game based on the film of the same name, released in for the PlayStation 2, Xbox, Nintendo GameCube, Game Boy Advance, PC, Macintosh and Mobile phones.





    mcdonalds
  • McDonald's Corporation is the world's largest chain of hamburger fast food restaurants, serving more than 58 million customers daily.

  • Just like in the States. Big Mac, Cheeseburger, Fries. Also McPork, Teriyaki burger, and shrimp sandwich. Despite what you hear the portions and food are exactly the same as in America. They’re not that much more expensive than America either.

  • chicken nuggets are not healthy or nutritious at all! Furthermore as the kids along with a considerable number of grown ups continue to gorge on McDonald’s chicken nuggets is not quite what the McDonald’s chicken nuggets are made of.   Sodium phosphate serves as one





    toys
  • An object for a child to play with, typically a model or miniature replica of something

  • (toy) plaything: an artifact designed to be played with

  • (toy) a nonfunctional replica of something else (frequently used as a modifier); "a toy stove"

  • A person treated by another as a source of pleasure or amusement rather than with due seriousness

  • An object, esp. a gadget or machine, regarded as providing amusement for an adult

  • (toy) dally: behave carelessly or indifferently; "Play about with a young girl's affection"











Violet in Action!




Violet in Action!





A McDonald's Happy Meal toy.

It has a glowing hoop, and when you press a button on the base it spins quickly giving the impression of a glowing ball surrounding her...very cool!

Deliberate long exposure to show the glowing ball effect.











"The Incredibles" figurines in motion




"The Incredibles" figurines in motion





These are Mc Donalds figurines i found in an antique. Like they can move, i have filmed them...

Music: "Honey" of Moby









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